Raising multiple dogs is no easy task, but when the dogs are a high energy, reactive breed it increases the challenges astronomically.  With three Miniature Pinschers under my roof, I have first hand experience with complete and total anarchy.

My dogs’ reactive behavior has been a thorn in my side since first rearing its ugly head when the girls were puppies.  Living with reactive dogs has created a crazy and chaotic home where stress sprinkles down in a drizzle or a waterfall depending on the day.  Every detail of daily life must be micro-managed in order to prevent the girls from gaining the upper hand, or in this case, paw.

Min Pins are a breed of dog that require constant supervision and management is key to keeping the girls out of trouble.  Baby gates are utilized to prevent access to the front entryway and the second floor of our home. The gates are also used when my husband and I need to contain the girls in one room. I could not even imagine the mischief that would ensue if the girls had run of the entire house!

A primary source of frustration in our home is the living room windows.  The windows sit low and the girls can easily part the vertical blinds in order to see outside.  A favorite spot of my furry trio, their “window on the world” is where they can go from zero to sixty in less than three seconds. Of course, these episodes usually occur when I am upstairs or on the opposite side of the house!

Various items have been used to block the girls’ view, but Aspen usually outsmarts me and figures out a way to beat the system.

Most dogs go through agility tunnels, but Aspen likes to show off with a balancing act!

Most dogs only go through agility tunnels, but Aspen likes to show off with a balancing act!

Aspen in window

A sheet, really? This was way too easy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The girls currently have “supervised visitation” while they take in the outside scenery and this latest strategy has worked the best thus far.
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All three of my Min Pins exhibit reactive behavior, but to varying degrees. A puzzle yet to be solved, Quest is the most reactive of the three and the one with which I have consistently struggled to make progress.

I usually avoid taking Quest on walks with the other two because of her reactivity.  At full throttle, Quest will bark, lunge, and spin if she goes over threshold. That is all it takes to bring Malibu along for the ride.  Although Malibu has made huge strides to overcome her reactive tendencies, if Quest is singing a song, Malibu wants to make it a duet.

Aspen’s reactivity is different from her sisters.  She is our best behaved dog in public situations, but the noisiest of the three at home.  Stimulated by outdoor sights and sounds, Aspen will frequently erupt into a barking frenzy.  She also barks at her sisters – a lot!

I am proud of how far Aspen and Malibu have come since puppyhood.  They are still reactive, but it is more manageable now.

Since taking on this pack of puppies, my world has been turned upside down. I had no idea how incredibly difficult it would be to raise three Miniature Pinschers.  Not one to give up, I will continue to utilize the strategies that have worked while seeking additional ones to place in my ever-expanding toolbox.